There are many reasons for which we should all love trees: they change carbon dioxide into the oxygen we breathe, sequester carbon, and provide shelter for many creatures. But within this article, we want to focus on how amazing some of them look.

Granted, not all of these amazing beautiful trees are trees (the Wisteria is a vine, Rhododendrons are shrubs, and bamboo technically belongs to the grass family), but we’ll give them a pass because they are amazing, huge and beautiful. So once you step outside and take a breath of fresh air, hug the nearest tree and say thank you!

125+ Year Old Rhododendron “Tree” In Canada

This huge 125-year-oldold rhododendron is technically not a tree – most are considered to be shrubs. You can find out more about it here. (Image credits: reddit)

144-Year-Old Wisteria In Japan

Image credits: tungnam.com.hk

At 1,990 square meters (about half an acre), this huge wisteria is the largest of its kind in Japan. Read more about it here. (Image credits: y-fu)

Wind-Swept Trees In New Zealand

These trees on Slope Point, the southern tip of New Zealand, grow at an angle because they’re constantly buffeted by extreme antarctic winds. Find out more here. (Image credits: Seabird Nz)

Beautiful Japanese Maple In Portland, Oregon

Image credits: falcor88

Image credits: Tom Schwabel

Antarctic Beech Draped In Hanging Moss In Oregon

The antarctic beech is native to Chile and Argentina, though this specimen is from the U.S.’ North Pacific region. (Image credits: Drew Hopper)

Blooming Cherry Trees in Bonn, Germany

This beautiful tunnel of cherry blossoms blooms in Bonn, Germany in April. To see more tunnels like this one, click here. (Image credits: Adas Meliauskas)

Angel Oak In John’s Island In South Carolina

The Angel Oak in South Carolina stands 66.5 ft (20 m) tall and is estimated to be more than 1400 or 1500 years old. (Image credits: Daniela Duncan)

Flamboyant Tree, Brazil

The flamboyant tree is endemic to Madagascar, but it grows in tropical areas around the world. (Image credits: Salete T Silva)